UPGro win at Stockholm World Water Week

Patrick Thomson wins in Stockholm

Patrick Thomson, from the Oxford-led UPGro project “Gro For Good”, has won the prize for the best poster at World Water Week 2015 for the work that he and colleagues at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at Oxford have been doing on shallow groundwater monitoring using Smart Handpumps in Kenya. This work will continue under the UPGro Consortium phase.

A briefing note based on the information presented in the poster can be downloaded:

Patrick Thompson and his prize winning poster (photo: Katrina Charles)
Patrick Thompson and his prize winning poster (photo: Katrina Charles)

Groundwater Governance

10th March 2015

Two presentations followed extensive discussion. Groundwater risks and institutional responses in Kwale, Kenya (Jacob Katuva, Oxford University) and From Codes of Practice to a Code of Conduct – groundwater governance in Kenya from a drillers perspective (Tom Armstrong, JB Drilling). Practical issues of borehole design and construction, groundwater quality, gender and poverty as well as the realities of the Water Resource User Associations (WRUAs) in Kenya, and plans of the Kenya Water Industry Association (KWIA) were discussed.

Poster presentations about work in Zambia and Kenya (Video)

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At the IAH Congress, we asked two of the UPGro researchers to present their posters:

Jacob Mutua, Rural Focus Ltd, Kenya, describing the “Risks and Institutional Responses for Poverty Reduction in Rural Africa” Catalyst project

Dr Dan Lapworth talks about the project that he has been leading: “Mapping groundwater quality degradation beneath growing rural towns in SSA” in Zambia

New report: From Rights to Results in Rural Water Services – Evidence from Kyuso, Kenya

From the Catalyst Project team for Risks and Institutional Responses for Poverty Reduction in Rural Africa has come a new report:

From Rights to Results in Rural Water Services – Evidence from Kyuso, KenyaRights

“Institutional transformations are required if Africa is to deliver the universal Human Right to Water to 275 million rural people without improved water services. Improving the reliability of one million handpumps which should deliver drinking water to over 200 million rural Africans will be a major contribution to translating water rights into measureable results. This study tests a new maintenance service model over a one year period in rural Kenya using mobile-enabled data to improve operational and financial performance by reducing risks at scale.”

This and other publications from the project team can be found here