Gro for GooD open for business in Bomani, Kenya

Research Team collects samples from a borehole during the first groundwater sampling campaign in Sep – Oct 2015

“Groundwater is increasingly important for Kwale’s growth and development. It is a widely available water resource of high quality and low cost. Rural communities know this well and have relied on groundwater for generations managing the resource sustainably. With increasing variability in rainfall which supplies small and large dams, groundwater provides an important alternative for new water demands from irrigated agriculture, mining or tourism.

“Managing groundwater sustainably so the resource is not over-used or contaminated is challenging. Science can provide support to help make better informed decisions. Oxford University is proud to work with the County Government, Water Resources Management Authority, Base Titanium Ltd., KISCOL, Rural Focus Ltd. and local communities to develop a better understanding of groundwater risks to help protect the resource for everyone.

“The Gro for GooD project – Groundwater Risk Management for Growth and Development – competed in an international research competition and was ranked in first place for the innovative and inclusive nature of the project. Working with the University of Nairobi, JKUAT and Rural Focus Ltd. in Kenya and the Polytechnic University of Barcelona in Spain (UPC), the team boasts some of Kenya’s and the world’s best scientists working on groundwater systems from hydrological, geophysical, geochemical, social and economic disciplines.

“After the Governor of Kwale County graciously opened the project in 2015 we are now delighted to share the first of regular quarterly newsletters providing updates to the people of Kwale on the progress of the project. This includes a new project office in Bomani with local staff working with all our partners. We hope you find this newsletter relevant and interesting and look forward to your feedback.”

– Dr Rob Hope

Photo: Research Team collects samples from a borehole during the first groundwater sampling campaign in Sep – Oct 2015