Dr Robinah Kulabako: A new vision for empowered communities and safe water in Kampala

Dr Robinah Kulabako of Makerere University describes the research work of T-GroUP – one of five projects in the UPGro (Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poor) and her work on Transition Management to trigger community action to improve access to safe water.

Listen to the interview with her by Isaiah Esipisu on Soundcloud

Find out more here: t-group.science/
and here: upgro.org/

Photo: Dr. Kulabako at Africa Water Week 2018 (I. Esipisu)

The climate is changing – we need groundwater more than ever

UPGro Ambassador, Dr Callist Tindimugaya, attended last month’s COP meeting in Madrid – the United Nations global negotiation meeting to try an agree ways forward to tackle climate change.

He was attending as part of the Government of Uganda delegation to bring forward opportunities and challenges – in particular the key role of groundwater as a resource that can help buffer against some of the effects of shifting rainfall patterns across Eastern Africa.

In this interview with Isaiah Esipisu, he explains why African groundwater needs to be on the lips of the climate negotiators.

AMCOW launches its Pan-African Groundwater Program

re-posted from GRIPP

AMCOW, the intergovernmental apex body on water in Africa, was established in 2002 with its secretariat in Abuja, Nigeria, to provide political oversight and promote cooperation, security, social and economic development, and poverty eradication among member states.

The aim is to achieve this through the effective management of the continent’s water resources, and the provision of water supply and sanitation services.In recognition of the importance of groundwater to the continent’s sustainable development, a continent-wide strategic groundwater initiative was part of the resolution of AMCOW’s Sixth Ordinary Session in Brazzaville, Republic of the Congo, in May 2007.

While initial ambitions evolved around formalizing the initiative as an African Groundwater Commission, subsequent attempts and further analysis carried out at several meetings, including the Technical Advisory Meeting and Africa Groundwater Stakeholders Workshop in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in 2017, and the 7th Africa Water Week in Libreville, Gabon, in 2018, resulted in the initiative being invigorated as the strategic APAGroP.

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Dr. Karen Villholth, Leader of IWMI’s Research Group on Resilient and Sustainable Groundwater, emphasized the strength in partnerships in bringing forward the agenda of APAGroP (photo: AMCOW).

APAGroP strongly aligns with the AMCOW strategy for the period 2018-2030, guiding its activities and the continent towards achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as well as the Africa Water Vision 2025 and the AfricaSan Ngor Commitments for sanitation and hygiene.

Dr. Canisius Kanangire, Executive Secretary, AMCOW, expressed his appreciation and satisfaction with the present momentum, and support towards consolidating and further rolling out the Pan-African Groundwater Program (APAGroP).

The Experts’ and Stakeholders’ workshop provided background presentations of APAGroP as well as fruitful deliberation on the state of knowledge and management of groundwater in the African continent.

Presentations were made by AMCOW, international and African research institutions, Regional Economic Communities:

  • Economic Community of Central African States [ECCAS],
  • Economic Community of West African States [ECOWAS],
  • Intergovernmental Authority on Development [IGAD],
  • Southern African Development Community [SADC]),

international and intergovernmental organizations:

  •  Center for Environment and Development for the Arab Region and Europe [CEDARE],
  • Observatoire du Sahara et du Sahel [OSS]), as well as key international river basin organizations
  • African Network of Basin Organizations [ANBO]) and financing institutions.

The workshop was supported by AMCOW; a recent Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) networking grant to the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) and the British Geological Survey (BGS); and the successful research program – Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poor (UPGro),

It helped crystalize a way forward in further harnessing and harvesting best knowledge and practice around groundwater to support sustainable development in the continent. GRIPP was strongly represented at the workshop through the following partners:

  • Africa Groundwater Network (AGW-Net);
  • Association of Water Well Drilling Rig Owners and Practitioners (AWDROP);
  • BGS; Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Germany;
  • International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH);
  • International Groundwater Resources Assessment Centre (IGRAC);
  • IWMI;
  • Skat Consulting Ltd. (Skat);
  • The World Bank (WB); and
  • United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization – International Hydrological Programme (UNESCO-IHP).

These partners expressed strong interest in further supporting the rollout of APAGroP.

Photo: AMCOW

AMCOW Pan-African Groundwater Programme gets underway in Nairobi

Research can only make a difference it is seen and understood by the people who can use it to make a difference. This is why UPGro is delighted to be participating in the new African Ministers’ Council on Water (AMCOW) Pan-African Groundwater Program (APAGP).

Today in Nairobi, is day one of a two-day workshop to discuss and plan how the new program will work and brings together a critical mass of national and international decision-makers and experts, facilitated by Dr Andy Bullock from the UPGro Knowledge Broker Team and Dr Kirsty Upton and Dr Karen Villholth of UPGro, Groundwater for Resilience in Africa Network (GRAN) and GRIPP. There will be inputs from senior UPGro researchers, including Prof. Japhet Kashaigili, Prof. Seifu Kebede, Dr Yahaya Nazoumou, and UPGro Ambassadors from the Africa Groundwater Network, Dr Callist Tindimugaya and Prof. Moustapha Diene.

We are looking forward to find practical ways to support this Pan-African initiative to strengthen sustainable groundwater management and use.

Follow what is happening on Twitter – follow  @amcowafrica

Picture: Event publicity posted via @amcowafrica

Wikipedia Edit-a-thon helps spread groundwater knowledge

(photo: Brighid O’Dochartaigh, BGS @beodoch)

Yesterday, delegates at the IAH 2019 Congress, in Malaga, took part in an official Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, led by BGS. This is an event where people get together to edit Wikipedia – often focused on a specific topic. It is an opportunity for people with similar interests to get together to improve the content of Wikipedia, while learning how to edit the online encyclopaedia.

Why an edit-a-thon for the Africa Groundwater Atlas?

There was very limited content in Wikipedia related to groundwater or hydrogeology in Africa, The aim of this edit-a-thon is to create new “Groundwater in…” pages for every country in Africa, based on the content of the Africa Groundwater Atlas, but summarised and edited for a more general audience.

Through this, we hope to make groundwater information more accessible to a wider audience and increase the awareness of groundwater issues in Africa.

Want to get involved, but not in Malaga? Worry not:

Create your own Wikipedia account

You’ll need a Wikipedia account in order to start editing. You can create your account before the edit-a-thon to speed things up – Create a Wikipedia Account.

You’ll set up a Username that will be visible to everyone viewing any pages that you edit. You don’t have to use your real name if you don’t want to – but you can if you want. Note that accounts (and usernames) are for individuals and not organisations.

Getting started with Wikipedia editing

In the edit-a-thon we’ll lead you through everything you need to know about editing Wikipedia pages! But if you want to get started learning how in advance, try the Wikipedia Adventure, where you can learn to edit Wikpedia in about an hour.

Want to know more or need help?

Drop us an email at AfricaGWAtlas@bgs.ac.uk with the info above and we can tell you more about helping remotely!

After the event we will upload all the resources you need to get involved and create new Wikipedia pages on groundwater in Africa in your own time to a Google Drive Africa Groundwater Atlas resource folder.

Pages created and edited yesterday:

New drafts that you can help with:

 

Download digital country hydrogeology maps of Africa from the Africa Groundwater Atlas

The Africa Groundwater Atlas has released digital, GIS-enabled, national-scale hydrogeology maps for 38 African countries, which are freely available to download.
The online, open-access Africa Groundwater Atlas was launched in 2016.

It brings together groundwater information from many sources and provides a consistent overview of groundwater resources at a country scale for 51 countries in Africa. It is widely used by hydrogeologists, water supply practitioners, policymakers and others across Africa and beyond.

The atlas was developed by the BGS in partnership with the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) Burdon Groundwater Network for Developing Countries and groundwater experts across Africa. It was funded by the UK’s Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and UK Aid through the UPGro research programme.

The new country hydrogeology maps show the hydrogeology (aquifer type and productivity) and geology (with particular relevance to hydrogeology) at a scale of 1:5 million. At the moment, maps for 38 countries are available to download; maps for the remaining countries will be released later.

The maps are provided as free-to-download shapefiles (.shp), also known as ESRI ‘shape’ format. There is a single shapefile for each country, which contains attribute information for geology and hydrogeology themes in attribute tables. Each shapefile is provided with layer files with legends for geology and hydrogeology in English and, for selected countries, French or Portuguese. A user guide gives supporting information about the maps, how they were developed and how they can be used.

The successful, sustainable development of groundwater resources is critical to future safe water supplies in Africa and has a key role in future economic and social development and food security. Doing this depends on a good understanding of groundwater and hydrogeology. All too often, high-quality information about groundwater in Africa – even where it exists – is hard to find.

The Africa Groundwater Atlas is helping increase awareness and availability of information about groundwater in Africa. The country hydrogeology maps are available to download from the Africa Groundwater Atlas at http://www.bgs.ac.uk/africagroundwateratlas/index.cfm

For more information, please email AfricaGWAtlas@bgs.ac.uk.

Hidden Crisis project presentation in the China Africa water Forum Series No. 7, at Windhoek, Namibia

By Dessie Nedaw
8 August 2019

The China Africa Water Forum is a platform for all professionals within the fields of water science and technology in Africa and China. The China Africa Water Association also referred to as CAWA, is a non-profit organization that predominantly organizes annual events. One such event was held for three days from July 22 to July 24, 2019 in Windhoek, Namibia with title “Risk Reduction through Sustainable Water Management in Developing Countries”.

The conference was the seventh of the series held under the title China Africa Water forum. The conference has been prepared in collaboration between China Africa Water Association and Namibia’s chapter of Association of Hydro-geologists and other stakeholders. 

The opening speech by Minister of public enterprise has emphasized the current fresh water supply challenge of Namibia facing and the possible solution of desalinization as the future option. The Chinese Ambassador in Namibia has emphasized on the neeed of China Africa partnership in a win-win strategy based on mutual benefits. He mentioned the similarities of challenges faced by both China and Africa and stressed some of the innovative approaches and technologies in China stressing the importance of the forum for transfer of skill and knowledge.  Nearly 25 presentation from Africa and China covering a wide range of water related topics focusing in reducing risk of water supply, management and sustainable utilization water resources, transport and diffusion of water pollutants and exploration and development of groundwater has been addressed during the three days conference.

The Hidden Crisis project work was presented at the conference within the groundwater exploration and development theme – highlighting the work of the project to apply a tiered approach to assess functionality of handpumped borehole supplies in terms of different levels of performance. The findings have shown this approach to be helpful to unpack national statistics and develop more nuanced understanding of functionality within the country. 

The experience has given opportunity to highlight the project and also given good opportunity to share ideas from other professionals, particularly Chinese water experts. Ethiopia has formally requested to be the next organizer of China Africa water forum in the meeting.

Figure: Dessie Nedaw

Groundwater timeline shows the importance of good management to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals — Groundwater Solutions Initiative for Policy and Practice (GRIPP)

GRIPP and partner representatives at the launch of the Groundwater and SDG infographic during the 2nd SADC Groundwater Conference. From the left: Arnaud Sterckx, IGRAC; Karen Villholth, IWMI, Kirsty Upton, BGS, Brighton Munyai, SADC-GMI; Julian Conrad, Geohydrological and Spatial Solutions International (GEOSS) and IAH. An infographic entitled ‘GROUNDWATER – Critical for Sustainable Development’ illustrating a…

via Groundwater timeline shows the importance of good management to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals — Groundwater Solutions Initiative for Policy and Practice (GRIPP)

Technical brief now available – Project approach for defining and assessing rural water supply functionality and levels of performance

The Hidden Crisis project team have now published a Technical Brief on the methods developed and used by the project to assess rural water supply functionality and levels of performance – now available from here.

This technical brief is aimed at sharing the learning and approaches developed by the project to look at how the functionality and performance levels of boreholes equipped with handpumps (HPBs), can be assessed using a common set of definitions and methods. A tiered approach to defining and measuring functionality was found to be useful to examining functionality for different scales and purposes of monitoring. 

The report is aimed at national and regional actors involved in the provision and monitoring of rural water supply functionality.

The brief sets out the tiered functionality definitions, and accompanying survey methods, which were developed by the project and have been applied in functionality surveys across Ethiopia, Uganda and Malawi .

Photos: BGS © UKRI. Survey 1 Field teams, Uganda and Malawi

Rural water supply: a political economy analysis

The Hidden Crisis project team examined the political economy of rural water supply (RWS) in Ethiopia, Uganda and Malawi during 2017 and 2018. These are based on literature and interviews with government staff and water sector stakeholders to unpick systemic obstacles to sustainable access to water.  

The three reports summarising the key findings are now published – and available from here.

The findings provide an insight to some of the key structural factors which affect RWS performance (historical, institutional, actors) in the three countries – examining systematic factors, decision making logic and opportunities for reform.

Photo: BGS © UKRI. Hand-pumped borehole water supply, rural Malawi.